AVO Logo
Site Map | FAQ |
Alaska Volcano Observatory
Image Search | Recent Images | Popular Images | Browse Images 
You are here: Home > Images > Browse Images

AVO IMAGE DATABASE
First  < Previous  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  ... Next >  Last  
ImageDetailsVolcanoesKeywords
thumbnail
Caption:Shishaldin steaming, March 30, 2015.
Date:March 30, 2015 1:47 PM
Photographer:AVO Shishaldin webcam,
ShishaldinSteam
thumbnail
Caption:Shishaldin steaming, 21 Mar 2015. #akvolcano
Date:March 21, 2015 10:26 AM
Photographer:Musselwhite, Levi
ShishaldinSteam
thumbnail
Caption:MODIS satellite image showing resuspended Katmai 1912 ash being blown southeast over Shelikof Strait, March 12, 2015. This ash is being blown not from the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes, but rather from the lower Katmai river valley deposits. We acknowledge the use of Rapid Response imagery from the Land, Atmosphere Near real-time Capability for EOS (LANCE) system operated by the NASA/GSFC/Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) with funding provided by NASA/HQ.
Date:March 12, 2015 1:30 PM
Photographer:MODIS Rapid Response,
Katmai, NovaruptaTephra
thumbnail
Caption:Beautiful view of Cleveland (center, steaming), Carlisle (rear right) and Herbert (rear left) this morning from the CLCO webcam, March 12, 2015.
Date:March 12, 2015 10:04 AM
Photographer:Cleveland CLCO webcam,
Steam
thumbnail
Caption:Satellite image showing resuspended ash from the Katmai 1912 eruption blowing southeast over Shelikof Strait on March 11, 2015. Satellite image from NOAA AVHRR satellite.
Date:March 11, 2015 5:48 AM
Photographer:Waythomas, Chris
Katmai, NovaruptaTephra
thumbnail
Caption:Composite Landsat-8 image of Veniaminof Volcano collected on February 28, 2015. The grey scale base image is from the 15-meter-resolution "Panchromatic" band that records visible light. Superimposed onto it (in color) are short-wave infrared data that are sensitive to high temperatures. These data show high surface temperatures, expressed as radiance values (a measure or thermal emission), confined to the summit crater of the intracaldera cone. These areas of elevated surface temperatures are typical for Veniaminof during non-eruptive periods. The surface expression of the lava flows produced during the 2013 eruption, are seen as depressions in the snow cover on the south and east sides of the cone. A faint shadow from steam emissions can be seen over the summit icefield to the southeast of the cone, although the emissions themselves are not readily visible.
Date:February 28, 2015 9:40 PM
Photographer:Schneider, Dave
VeniaminofFumarolic activity, Volcano
thumbnail
Caption:Ash from Shiveluch volcano in Russia’s Kamchatka peninsula crossed the Bering Sea Saturday, February 28, 2015, and caused flight cancellations in western Alaska. The ash cloud is the linear blue feature seen in this image derived from NOAA satellite data. The ash cloud was tracked by the Tokyo and Anchorage Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers, which are responsible for forecasting the movement of potentially hazardous ash cloud. These forecasts provide the details for the issuance of warning messages. In Alaska, the National Weather Service Alaska Aviation Weather Unit issues ash warning messages.
Date:February 28, 2015 8:53 AM
Photographer:Alaska Volcano Observatory
Eruption cloud/ plume/ column, Tephra
thumbnail
Caption:Steaming from the summit of Shishaldin volcano, February 27, 2015. Photo taken 45 miles NNW of the volcano from a ship in the Bering Sea.
Date:February 27, 2015 6:31 PM
Photographer:Musselwhite, Levi
ShishaldinSteam
thumbnail
Caption:Looking closely at the intracaldera cone (visible just to the left of the tower in this image), a low-level degassing plume is visible at Veniaminof. Photo from the FAA Perryville webcam, February 25, 2015.
Date:February 25, 2015 2:09 AM
Photographer:FAA Perryville NW webcam
VeniaminofSteam
thumbnail
Caption:Here's a helpful picture for thinking about the size of earthquakes. We usually talk about the amount of energy released in an earthquake as the "earthquake magnitude". But earthquake magnitude is on a logarithmic scale. There is actually the energy of about 32 M1 earthquakes in one M2 earthquake. And the energy of 32 M2 earthquakes in one M3 earthquake...but because there is the equivalent energy of 32 M1 earthquakes for every M2 earthquake, there is actually the equivalent energy of 1,000 M1 earthquakes in a single M3 earthquake. As you go up the magnitude scale the numbers get gigantic - there is the equivalent energy of a billion M1 earthquakes in a M7 earthquake! Using the logarithmic magnitude scale makes discussion of earthquake sizes easier, although it sometimes masks the big differences between magnitudes. Volcanic earthquakes tend to be really small, usually less than M3. But remember, if a volcano usually has M1 earthquakes, and then has a M2 - it has released 32 times as much energy than usual. This is why AVO seismologists closely watch even the smallest earthquakes to look for changes at a volcano.
Date:February 25, 2015 12:00 AM
Photographer:Buurman, Helena
Volcano
thumbnail
Caption:Happy Valentine's Day from seismic stations MTBL, MNAT, MREP, MCIR, MGOD, and MSW on Makushin Volcano, Alaska.
Date:February 14, 2015 12:00 AM
Photographer:Anonymous
MakushinVolcano
thumbnail
Caption:This is a long-period horizontal seismometer, likely built for the World Wide Standard Seismological Network (WWSSN) in the early 1960s. The WWSSN was designed to detect underground nuclear tests. Further information about this type of instrument can be found at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History (http://americanhistory.si.edu/collections/search/object/nmah_1445876 ).
Date:February 11, 2015 1:43 PM
Photographer:Cameron, Cheryl
Just for fun
thumbnail
Caption:Here’s an example from Monday, February 9, 2015, of what “elevated seismicity” or tremor can look like at Shishaldin. In this spectrogram, warmer colors mean stronger signal. Shishaldin sometimes produces small puffs of ash, that can be seen in the seismic record as an increase in tremor. Other times the tremor will increase without any eruptive activity. Satellite and camera images help verify whether any ash was erupted. Figure courtesy of Helena Buurman, UAFGI.
Date:February 10, 2015 12:00 AM
Photographer:Buurman, Helena
ShishaldinVolcano
thumbnail
Caption:Small, low-level ash emission from the summit of Shishaldin Volcano, February 2, 2015.
Date:February 2, 2015 10:31 AM
Photographer:USGS Shishaldin webcam,
Tephra
thumbnail
Caption:Worldview satellite image overlain over topography showing Semisopochnoi volcano on January 30, 2015. The three prominent craters in the center belong to Mount Cerberus (named for the three-headed dog in Greek and Roman mythology); the peak behind and to the right of Cerberus is Anvil Peak. Sugarloaf Peak is in the foreground, just left of center. View is from the southwest.
Date:January 30, 2015 12:00 AM
Photographer:Schneider, Dave
SemisopochnoiVolcano
thumbnail
Caption:Perspective satellite image view of Cleveland Volcano from the south. Data is from the Landsat-8 satellite. Base image is visible wavelength data and shortwave-infrared data is overlain in color showing the location of elevated surface temperatures in the summit crater due to the presence of a small lava dome or plug.
Date:January 5, 2015 12:00 AM
Photographer:Schneider, Dave
ClevelandDome, Volcano
thumbnail
Caption:Evidence of a visitor to CLCO on Chuginadak Island: fox tracks in the fresh snow.
Date:December 27, 2014 2:03 PM
Photographer:Cleveland, Concord
ClevelandJust for fun
thumbnail
Caption:Akutan volcano's caldera and intracaldera cone, as seen from the air, looking to the southeast. The Alaska community of Akutan lies about 9 miles northeast, and is not visible in this photograph.
Date:December 5, 2014 5:28 PM
Photographer:MacPherson, Amy
AkutanCaldera/crater, Volcano
thumbnail
Caption:Pavlof Volcano, December 5, 2014. Photo courtesy of Royce Snapp.
Date:December 5, 2014 12:00 AM
Photographer:Snapp, Royce
PavlofFumarolic activity, Lava flow
thumbnail
Caption:Pavlof volcano steaming, as viewed from Nelson Lagoon, December 5, 2014. Photo courtesy of Merle Brandell.
Date:December 5, 2014 12:00 AM
Photographer:Brandell, Merle
PavlofFumarolic activity, Lava flow
thumbnail
Caption:Pavlof volcano steaming, as viewed from Nelson Lagoon, December 5, 2014. Photo courtesy of Merle Brandell.
Date:December 5, 2014 12:00 AM
Photographer:Brandell, Merle
PavlofFumarolic activity, Lava flow
thumbnail
Caption:Pavlof volcano steaming, as viewed from Nelson Lagoon, December 5, 2014. Photo courtesy of Merle Brandell.
Date:December 5, 2014 12:00 AM
Photographer:Brandell, Merle
PavlofFumarolic activity, Lava flow
thumbnail
Caption:Pavlof volcano steaming, as viewed from Nelson Lagoon, December 5, 2014. Photo courtesy of Merle Brandell.
Date:December 5, 2014 12:00 AM
Photographer:Brandell, Merle
PavlofFumarolic activity, Lava flow
thumbnail
Caption:Pavlof volcano, earthshadow, and almost-full moon, December 4, 2014. Photo courtesy of Royce Snapp.
Date:December 4, 2014 12:00 AM
Photographer:Snapp, Royce
PavlofStratovolcano, Volcano
thumbnail
Caption:Steam rises from the summit of Shishaldin volcano on the evening of December 3, 2014. View is to the south. Photo taken by Levi Musselwhite, aboard a boat in the Bering Sea, approximately 75 miles north of Shishaldin.
Date:December 3, 2014 6:47 PM
Photographer:Musselwhite, Levi
ShishaldinEruption cloud/ plume/ column
First  < Previous  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  ... Next >  Last  
Contact AVO Privacy Accessibility Information Quality FOIA
URL: www.avo.alaska.edu/images/browse.php
Page modified: May 14, 2014 14:08
Contact Information: AVO Web Team

twitter @alaska_avo
facebook alaska.avo
email Receive volcano updates by email: USGS VNS