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Caption:This high-resolution satellite radar image of the summit of Shishaldin shows the growing central scoria cone filling most of the pre-eruptive summit crater. A new vent within this cone and another to the south have formed during recent more explosive activity. Lava flows and lahars are also visible radiating from the summit to the northwest, north, and northeast. Some distortion is caused by the oblique satellite look angle and the terrain correction. This imagery was provided by Simon Plank (German Aerospace Center, DLR) through an ongoing collaboration with the Alaska Volcano Observatory on remote sensing of volcanic eruptions.
Date:November 14, 2019 5:13 PM
Photographer:Dietterich, Hannah
Shishaldin
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Caption:A clear view of Shishaldin in this Nov 11 WorldView-3 image captured a new lava flow to the NE that extends ~1 km from the summit cone (red in this near-infrared composite image). Below the flow, a large network of lahars with meltwater channels has formed, extending >5.5 km along the flow path from the vent (4.5 km from the lava flow toe). The lahars branch at 3 km from vent with an eastern flow reaching ~4.5 km from vent, as well. Ash deposits cover the NE sector of the volcano. A second northward lava flow is now 1.2 km long and still shows some incandescence near the vent. It is much less active with minimal lahar activity at the front. Glowing spatter dots the scoria cone surface in all directions and hot spatter on the upper flanks beyond the crater rim is apparent in shortwave infrared bands.
Date:November 11, 2019 10:41 PM
Photographer:Dietterich, Hannah
Shishaldin
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Caption:A volcanic "smoke ring" produced in the ongoing eruption of Shishaldin was captured in this clear WorldView-3 satellite view on Nov 11, 2019. These rare clouds are produced from strombolian eruptive activity and have been observed during eruptions of Stromboli and Etna volcanoes in Italy. New black lahar deposits extending from an active lava flow melting snow and ice upslope are also seen in the background.
Date:November 11, 2019 10:41 PM
Photographer:Dietterich, Hannah
Shishaldin
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Caption:This DigitalGlobe WorldView-3 near-infrared (NIR) composite image on November 3 shows a branched active flow down the northwest slope. The western lobe has a length of 900 m, whereas the eastern one extends further to ~1000 m from the vent. New lahars to the south are now visible extending at least 1700 m from the crater rim, and the ones to southwest are 1500 m. Lahar formation downslope from the new lava flow extends to 2 km from the vent. In the vent area, spatter is visible above the crater and on the slopes of the cone. No significant new tephra deposits are visible.
Date:November 3, 2019 10:15 PM
Photographer:Dietterich, Hannah
Shishaldin
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Caption:Volcanic gas emissions from summit fumaroles on Makushin Volcano form a small plume in light winds.
Date:October 31, 2019 10:02 AM
Photographer:Kaufman, Max
MakushinSteam, Volcano
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Caption:Multispectral DigitalGlobe high-resolution imagery of Shishaldin from October 28 22:20 UTC shows a variety of eruptive deposits from the ongoing activity (left: near Infrared RGB, right: shortwave Infrared). The lava flow on the northwest slope is active but mostly concealed by clouds, and the SWIR anomaly extends ~850 m from the central vent. The top of the flow where it spills out of the summit crater is visible near the vent. The central spatter cone is shown by the NIR and SWIR anomalies (although SWIR is saturated, leaving a hole of no data), and spatter on snow on the upper slopes can be seen. A distinct steam plume is visible, as well. On the flanks, an apron of tephra deposits extends to the north about 2.5 km. A few short lahars are visible through the clouds near the summit, but the biggest feature is the long lahar to the NW that branches extensively at lower slopes and travels at least 5 km from the summit to the edge of the image.
Date:October 28, 2019 10:20 PM
Photographer:Dietterich, Hannah
Shishaldin
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Caption:This near infrared multispectral DigitalGlobe image from October 28 22:20 UTC shows the summit crater of Shishaldin. A lava flow spilling out of the crater can be seen on the northwest side. The central spatter cone is cloaked in steam within the crater, with a steam plume drifting to the NE and deposits of spatter on snow on the upper slopes.
Date:October 28, 2019 10:20 PM
Photographer:Dietterich, Hannah
Shishaldin
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Caption:This clear view of Shishaldin in a Sentinel-2 image from 10/24/2019 shows incandescence in the summit crater with a very small steam plume. The summit crater is filled with lava that is escaping the crater rim to the NW and feeding a ~800-m-long lava flow that is highlighted in the near-infrared. This flow is melting snow, feeding a lahar extending below the cloud deck out of view. No other lava flows beyond the summit crater are apparent, but another lahar to the NNE extends about 1.3 km downslope. The summit area is darkened by deposits to about 800 m radius to the north with small lahars extending a similar distance to the east.
Date:October 24, 2019 10:06 PM
Photographer:Dietterich, Hannah
Shishaldin
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Caption:This clear view of Shishaldin in a Sentinel-2 image from 10/24/2019 shows incandescence in the summit crater with a very small steam plume. The summit crater is filled with lava that is escaping the crater rim to the NW and feeding a ~800-m-long lava flow. This in turn feeds a lahar extending below the cloud deck out of view. No other lava flows beyond the summit crater are apparent, but another lahar to the NNE extends about 1.3 km downslope. The summit area is darkened by deposits to about 800 m radius to the north with small lahars extending a similar distance to the east. The dark streak of an ash deposit extends at least 8.5 km to the SE.
Date:October 24, 2019 10:06 PM
Photographer:Dietterich, Hannah
Shishaldin
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Caption:Incandescence, due to hot material at the summit of Shishaldin, visible in Shishaldin webcam image (circled area) on the evening of Oct 21, 2019.
Date:October 21, 2019 9:33 PM
Photographer:Shishaldin webcamera,
ShishaldinEruption cloud/ plume/ column
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Caption:Infrasonic tremor from likely Strombolian eruptive activity at Shishaldin volcano as registered on AVO's newly upgraded infrasound array in Sand Point, AK. The calculated back azimuth is pegged strongly in the direction of Shishaldin. Infrasound is low-frequency (inaudible) sound energy that propagates long distances in the atmosphere.
Date:October 21, 2019 7:20 PM
Photographer:Kaufman, Max
ShishaldinInfrasound
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Caption:Photograph of a steam plume at Shishaldin taken by an ACE Air Cargo pilot from flight AER963 into Cold Bay on October 21, 2019.
Date:October 21, 2019 2:45 PM
Photographer:Mosier, Ben
Shishaldin
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Caption:Steam emissions from strombolian eruptive activity in the summit crater of Shishaldin Volcano as seen from the NW.
Date:October 21, 2019 1:03 PM
Photographer:Camera, Web
ShishaldinEruption cloud/ plume/ column, Steam, Stratovolcano, Volcano
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Caption:Steam emissions from eruptive activity in the summit crater of Shishaldin volcano as seen from the SE, on Oct 21, 2019.
Date:October 21, 2019 12:08 PM
Photographer:Camera, Web
ShishaldinEruption cloud/ plume/ column, Infrasound, Stratovolcano, Volcano
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Caption:Shishaldin summit on October 21, 2019 from Cold Bay. Strombolian activity with incandescence is visible within the crater, as well as a steam plume rising above. Courtesy of Ben Lagasse and Andrew Reeves.
Date:October 21, 2019 12:00 AM
Photographer:Lagasse, Ben
ShishaldinEruption cloud/ plume/ column, Lava fountaining
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Caption:Upgrade of AVO's Sand Point infrasound array, Oct 2019. This 6-element listening array is designed to detect explosive activity at Pavlof Volcano, 90km (56 mi) to the west. Alder groves provide excellent protection from the winds on Popof Island. The perforated aluminum cone helps reduce wind noise.
Date:October 15, 2019 12:46 PM
Photographer:Kaufman, Max
ArrayFieldwork operations, Infrasound
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Caption:Upgrade of AVO's Sand Point infrasound array, Oct 2019. This 6-element listening array is designed to detect explosive activity at Pavlof Volcano, 90km (56 mi) to the west. The infrasound sensors each have 2 ports to the outside of their cases.
Date:October 15, 2019 12:39 PM
Photographer:Kaufman, Max
ArrayFieldwork operations, Infrasound
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Caption:Upgrade of AVO's Sand Point infrasound array, Oct 2019. This 6-element listening array is designed to detect explosive activity at Pavlof Volcano, 90km (56 mi) to the west. Alder groves provide excellent protection from the winds on Popof Island. The perforated aluminum cone covers the box and helps reduce wind noise.
Date:October 15, 2019 12:34 PM
Photographer:Kaufman, Max
ArrayFieldwork operations, Infrasound
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Caption:Upgrade of AVO's Sand Point infrasound array, Oct 2019. This 6-element listening array is designed to detect explosive activity at Pavlof Volcano, 90km (56 mi) to the west. Alder groves provide excellent protection from the winds on Popof Island. The perforated aluminum cone helps reduce wind noise.
Date:October 15, 2019 12:28 PM
Photographer:Kaufman, Max
ArrayFieldwork operations, Infrasound
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Caption:Redoubt Volcano
Date:October 8, 2019 9:18 PM
Photographer:Mayo, Wyatt
RedoubtDome, Volcano
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Caption:DigitalGlobe image showing the crater area of Shishaldin with a small wispy plume. The previously active scoria cone and surface lava flows have collapsed into the crater and are no longer visible.
Date:October 4, 2019 10:37 PM
Photographer:Dietterich, Hannah
Shishaldin
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Caption:Progression of Shishaldin Eruption as seen in a comparison between DigitalGlobe imagery acquired on October 24 and 28, 2019. Lahars and pyroclastic deposits to the north are much more extensive on October 28, and the summit spatter cone and active lava flow can be seen as bright in near infrared (red pixels) in both images.
Date:October2019 12:00 AM
Photographer:Dietterich, Hannah
Shishaldin
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Caption:AVO geologist Matt Loewen in the USGS Alaska Tephra Lab sorting rock samples collected from Iliamna volcano in August 2019. Analyses of these samples will tell us about the eruptive history of this volcano.
Date:September 26, 2019 5:03 PM
Photographer:Wallace, Kristi
ArrayPeople in action
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Caption:Veniaminof, September 21, 2019. Photo courtesy of Bill Stahl, taken from Sandy River.
Date:September 21, 2019 12:00 AM
Photographer:Stahl, Bill
VeniaminofCaldera/crater
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Caption:Veniaminof, September 21, 2019. Photo courtesy of Bill Stahl, taken from Sandy River.
Date:September 21, 2019 12:00 AM
Photographer:Stahl, Bill
VeniaminofCaldera/crater, Cinder cone
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